Architecture

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Casa Bruma

Casa Bruma

Consisting of nine individual units, the Casa Bruma weaves around the natural landscape. The residence sits on the outskirts of Mexico City. A network of pavilions is organized around a central courtyard. Strategically placed on the site, the structures wrap around the existing trees. Each one houses a different function and is connected by a series of stone walkways. A black concrete facade gives the exteriors a cohesive uniform. The same dark hue bleeds into the interior while oak finishes create a warm contrast. Large panels of glazing frame in the surrounding vegetation. When open, the glass doors expand the interior out to the inner lawn.

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Wye River Container House

Wye River Container House

Perched on a hillside overlooking the ocean, the Wye River Container House is an off-grid retreat on Australia’s Surf Coast. The home is made up of three 20-foot containers sitting on a foundation of stilts. A pair of the units forms the main living space while the remaining volume houses two bedrooms. Their exterior is clad in a dark galvanized steel. Fitted with planting wires and a grass roof, the facade blends into the surrounding forest landscape. Internally, marine plywood gives the interior a minimal but warm aesthetic. Glazing in the rear opens out to a south-facing deck affording views of the nearby sea.

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Curacautin Lake House

Curacautin Lake House

Surrounded by views of the Llaima volcano and the nearby waterfront, the Curacautin Lake House complements the Chilean landscape with a dark minimalist form. The simple, geometric volume is clad in black galvanize steel. Recycled native wood lines the inside, a warm contrast to the exterior facade. The home is organized around a central living area. A skylight washes the double-height room in natural light creating a spacious place for gathering. Large panels of glazing afford the interior expansive views of the natural landscape while a rooftop terrace provides vistas of the Araucania mountain range in the distance.

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Ancaster Creek House

Ancaster Creek House

Housed in a contemporary shell, the Ancaster Creek House reworks the traditional house plan to accommodate a multi-generational family. The L-shaped structure runs along a stream in Ontario. Its ground floor is dedicated to the parent’s suite. Organized like an apartment, the unit offers a kitchenette and living area that are equipped with special features that adapt to memory loss while separate bedroom can serve both guests or a live-in nurse. A sculpted wooden staircase leads to the homeowner’s quarters housing a master suite, sitting room, and an office. On the opposite wing, the main living, kitchen, and dining room area wraps around a central courtyard created by the two intersecting volumes. Clad in floor-to-ceiling glazing, this communal space looks out onto the landscape, highlighting a single tree and the neighboring stream.

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House on Mount Maigmo

House on Mount Maigmo

Built from natural stone and concrete, the House on Mount Maigmo is a partially sunken, mostly hidden abode. A tunnel-like main volume connects the front and rear of the house, framing views of the titular hill on the former and the 16th-century Tibi reservoir on the latter. The hallway-like space holds the kitchen and dining areas, while a small staircase to one side connects with the bedroom and airy bathroom.

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Casa Hualle

Casa Hualle

Sited on a grassy plot near the Villarrica volcano in Chile, the Casa Hualle draws inspiration from its active neighbor with a dark timber cladding. The simple volume takes on a geometric silhouette with a folded roofline. Covered in a charcoal-washed verticle siding, the exterior stands out from the rustic landscape while also nodding to the region’s vernacular architecture. Inside, washed plywood panels line the interior. The minimal palette acts as a backdrop for strategically placed windows that frame in the dramatic landscape surrounding the property.

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Mikkeli Wave House

Mikkeli Wave House

Taking design cues from boats and airplanes, the Mikkeli Wave House completely reimagines the classic log home. A mixture of wood and steel form a unique curved design. The front elevation is clad in Finnish spruce while the rear opens up to the landscape with a glass facade. Exposed logs and beams are reminiscent of traditional cabin interiors but are modernized with a whitewash. Encased in glass, the main living area opens out to an expansive deck. Overlooking the water, the oversized roof extends over the terrace and hot tub creating a sheltered outdoor space to take in the views.

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Grasshopper Studio

Grasshopper Studio

An architect and landscape designer become their own clients for the Grasshopper Studio. The husband-wife team expands their 1940s Seattle home. In an effort to preserve the main house’s modest footprint, the new structure is located along the lot’s rear alley. Its open floorplan creates a versatile space, allowing it to function as a guesthouse, workspace, or playroom. The two buildings are connected by a covered walkway, creating a central courtyard. Inspired by ancient Chinese housing, this paved terrace offers a protected outdoor area for dining and entertaining beneath a single Silk tree.

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Headland House

Headland House

Sitting on a 150-acre site on the Australian coast, the Headland House is formed to take advantage of both of its impressive landscapes. The home is built on a slope where the Illawarra Range runs into the sea. Its contemporary exterior is clad in a mix of metal, wood, stone, and concrete, a material palette that compliments the rustic scenery. A series of angled structures are organized around a courtyard with a swimming pool, sheltering it from the harsh winds. Large sliding glass doors create a seamless connection between the main living area and the outdoor space. On either end of the home, a pair of cantilever volumes extends out over the hillside. Capped with floor to ceiling glazing, each one is positioned to capture its own unique view of Werri Beach and the property’s expansive pastures.

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House of Many Worlds

House of Many Worlds

Extending on a family home in Norway, the House of Many Worlds welcomes a birch-lined addition. The majority of the room is occupied by a dining room although built-in shelving creates a workspace on the opposite end. Above, a loft encased in metal screens offers a hideout for reading and relaxing. Natural light floods the new space courtesy of large glazed openings in the walls and ceiling. Paired with the pale plywood casing, the interior takes on a bright, minimalist aesthetic. Black finishes in the kitchen and window bench provide a dark contrast while also reflecting the exteriors blackened timber cladding.

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